Sunday, May 31, 2015

Citrus Swallowtail

Citrus Swallowtail
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5x7'' Ivory Matt
$45
Papilio xuthus

First introduced in Hawaii in 1971 from Japan or Guam, this is the only variety of swallowtail found on the Hawaiian Islands.  The larvae of this butterfly feed on plants from the citrus family.  

Saturday, May 30, 2015

Long-tailed Blue

Long-tailed Blue
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5x7'' Ivory Matt
$45

Lampides boeticus


This is a common butterfly found throughout Hawaii.  Also called the “Pea Blue Butterfly,” the larvae feed on flowers, seeds, and pods of the legume family.

Friday, May 29, 2015

Monarch


Monarch
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5x7'' Ivory Matt
$45

Danaus plexippus


The Monarch Butterfly is one of the most familiar and recognized butterflies found on North America.  Also known as the “Milkweed Butterfly” because of its diet on the milkweed plant, it is common throughout the Hawaiian Islands.  

Thursday, May 28, 2015

Hawaiian Blue

Hawaiian Blue
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5x7'' Ivory Matt
$45

Udara blackburni


One of only two endemic species of butterfly on Hawaii, this relatively uncommon butterfly is also known as the Koa Butterfly because it feeds on the nectar of the flowers of the Koa tree.

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Kamehameha Butterfly

Kamehameha Butterfly
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5x7'' Ivory Matt
$45

Vanessa tameamea

Named after the royal House of Kamehameha, this butterfly was first identified in 1821 and is found on all of the main Hawaiian Islands.  The Kamehameha Butterfly is the Hawaiian state insect and one of only two endemic species of butterfly on Hawaii.

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Kukui

Kukui
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5x7'' Ivory Matt
$45
Aleurites moluccana


The Kukui, or Candlenut Tree, is the state tree of Hawaii.  The Kukui was and is an important resource.  It fruits year-round and produces up to 100 pounds of Kukui nuts each year.  The Kukui nuts, which are 80% oil, were used as a lighting fuel source.  The nuts can also be polished and used ornamentally and in lei making.  Today, Kukui oil still has several uses: to polish and preserve wood, as a lubricant, and for skin care products.  The nut is also an effective laxative.  Dyes can also be made from the leaves, fruits, roots, and bark of the tree.  Additionally, the soot from burnt Kukui nuts produces dark black ink that was used in tattooing.  

Monday, May 25, 2015

Koa

Koa
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5x7'' Ivory Matt
$45
Acacia koa

Endemic to Hawaii, the Koa Tree is the largest Hawaiian tree that can be found on the islands.  In some rainforests, Koa trees have been found to be over 100 feet tall with 12-foot diameters.  The hardwood of Koa is highly desirable and a good building material.  Anciently, Hawaiians used Koa wood for building their large, open-ocean canoes, some of which could reach over 100 feet in length.  

Sunday, May 24, 2015

‘Ohai

‘Ohai
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5x7'' Matt
$45

Sesbania tomentosa

This short shrub with sweet smelling leaves is endemic to the Hawaiian Islands.  The leaves are covered in thousands of tiny hairs, which act to shade the plant from the sun and to help gather moisture out of the air.  The beautiful coral-red flowers were used extensively for lei-making.  This plant is endangered.    

Saturday, May 23, 2015

Yellow Hibiscus


Yellow Hibiscus
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5x7'' Ivory Matt
Not Available 
 Hibiscus brackenridgei

This variety of Hibiscus is endemic to Hawaii and was once found on all of the major islands, however, it is now highly endangered.  The Yellow Hibiscus, also known by its Hawaiian name, Ma’ohauhele, is the Hawaiian State flower.  This is a dry forest shrub that can form dense thickets.  A yellow-green dye can be made from the leaves and flowers of this plant.  


Friday, May 22, 2015

Taro

Taro
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5x7'' Ivory Matt
$45
Colocasia esculenta

Called Kalo in Hawaiian, Taro is the most important plant in Hawaiian culture.  Taro, which is rich in carbohydrates, vitamins A, B, and C, and a number of other enzymes, was the staple food source for Ancient Hawaiians.  Poi, which is made from Taro, is produced after the Taro plant is steamed and then mashed into a thick paste.  Besides being a food staple, Taro is also important in Hawaiian religion.  According to Hawaiian beliefs, Taro, or Kalo, was the elder brother of mankind.  Kalo, as the elder brother, cares for and nourishes mankind.     

Thursday, May 21, 2015

Sea Turtle

Sea Turtle
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5x7'' Ivory Matt
$45
Chelonia mydas

Called Honu in Hawaiian, Sea Turtles are a common sight in Hawaii.  Two species of sea turtle, the Green Turtle and the Hawksbill Turtle are found in Hawaii, although the Green Turtle is the most common of the two species.  Green Turtles graze on algae and sea grasses along shorelines mostly in the early morning and late afternoon.  Unlike Green Turtles found elsewhere in the world, Hawaiian Green Turtles can be found basking on beaches during the day.  Green Turtles can reach a length of about four feet (1.22 m) and weigh a maximum of 400 pounds (181 kg).

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Triton’s Trumpet

Triton’s Trumpet
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5x7'' Ivory Matt
$45
Charonia tritonis


Pictured center.  Triton’s Trumpet is a marine gastropod mollusk that is one of the largest mollusks in Hawaiian waters, reaching a maximum length of 20 inches (50 cm).  Hunting at night, they feed on starfish and urchins.  Called Pu’ole in Hawaiian, it was and is used anciently and today as a trumpet before ceremonial occasions.  The name for this shell comes from the Greek god Triton, who was the messenger of the sea and was often depicted blowing a shell horn to calm or raise the waves.

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Ghost Crab

Ghost Crab
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5x7'' Ivory Matt
$45
Ocypode ceratophthalma

The Ghost Crab is most active at night, scavenging for plant or animal material that washes ashore.  During the day they burrow into the sand just above the waterline to keep moist and cool.  Called ‘Ohiki in Hawaiian, Ancient Hawaiians ate Ghost Crabs salted, raw, or broiled.  This crab measures up to three inches (8 cm) across.

Monday, May 18, 2015

Scallop

Scallop
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5x7'' Ivory Matt
$45
Pectinidae

The Latin family name Pectinidae means “comb” and possibly refers to the comb-like appearance of scallop shells.  Scallops are saltwater clams that can actually swim by rapidly opening and closing their valves.  Their shells are one of the most recognized seashells and have been depicted in art and architecture throughout history around the world.

Sunday, May 17, 2015

Seahorse

Seahorse
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5x7'' Ivory Matt
$45
Hippocampus kuda

Seahorses vary in size, according to their species and can range from 1.5 to 14 inches (3.8 to 36 cm).  They feed on crustacean plankton.  Because seahorses are not very good swimmers, they move around by hovering or slowly gliding from place to place.  Seahorses acquired their name both because of their resemblance to horses and because of their unusual vertically-oriented (head up and tail down) posture.   

Saturday, May 16, 2015

Sea Star

Sea Star
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5x7'' Ivory Matt
$45
Linckia multifora


Sea Stars are slow-moving creatures that can be found within crevices on shallow reefs or under rocks.  They have the ability to regenerate damaged arms if they loose parts or whole arms to predators.  Interestingly, this Sea Star can reproduce by detaching an arm, which can grow into another Sea Star as long as it has a part of the necessary organs.  The Hawaiian name for the Sea Star is pe’ape’a.  Sea Stars can measure up to five inches (13 cm) across.  They feed on organic debris from the reef. 

Friday, May 15, 2015

Octopus

Octopus
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5x7'' Ivory Matt
$45
Octopus cyanea

Anciently and today, octopus has been a popular food choice.  Ancient Hawaiians were quite skilled at capturing Octopuses, either by attracting them with movements of a lure (constructed of a large cowry shell that was lashed on a hook) or by spearing them.  The Hawaiian name for octopus is He’e.  Hawaiian octopus species are relatively small in comparison to the giant octopus of the Pacific Northwest.  Hawaiian octopuses can reach a maximum size of three feet (90 cm) and weigh 10 pounds (4.5 kg).  They feed on reef crustaceans, mollusks, and fishes.   

Thursday, May 14, 2015

Plein Air Painting at Foster Botanical Gardens

Today I spent a somewhat rainy day at the Foster Botanical Gardens sketching under the trees.





video

Antler Coral

Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5x7'' Ivory Matt
$45
Pocillopora eydouxi

The genus Pocillopora is comprised of a group of stony corals from the family Pocilloporidae, and are commonly referred to as “Cauliflower” or “Brush” corals.  Pocillopora corals are known as “reef-builders”, and they are one of four species of coral that have largely contributed to Hawaiian reef construction.  Antler corals, specifically, are found in colonies that can measure up to three feet (90 cm) and they obtain their nutrients from symbiotic zooxanthellae.  Ancient Hawaiians used coral (Ko’a in Hawaiian) to file or sand wooden objects, and it was also important in the building of Heiau (temples) dedicated to fishing.  

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Orangespine Unicornfish

Orangespine Unicornfish
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5x7'' Ivory Matt
$45

Naso lituratus


The Hawaiian name for this fish is umauma lei, umauma meaning “chest” and lei, meaning “garland”, perhaps referring to the coloring and patterning around the eyes and mouth.  Ancient Hawaiians used this fish both for food and for their tough skin, which was used for drumheads.  The Genus name for this fish, Naso, comes from the Latin word nasus, which means “nose,” and the species name lituratus means “erased” or “blotted out”, referring to the fact that this is a hornless unicornfish.  These fish can live as long as 12 years.  The Orangespine Unicornfish measures up to 24 inches (60 cm) long and feeds on leafy seaweeds.  

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Threadfin Butterflyfish

Threadfin Butterflyfish
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5 x 7'' Ivory Matt
$45

Chaetodon auriga

The Hawaiian name for this fish is Kikakapu, meaning “strongly prohibited.”  Kikakapu refers to several species of Butterflyfish, and suggests sacred associations.  The species name from the Latin word auriga, means “charioteer”, possibly because of the whip-like dorsal fin.  The Threadfin Butterflyfish measures up to eight inches (20 cm) long and forages on sand-dwelling invertebrates.  

Monday, May 11, 2015

Achilles Tang

Achilles Tang
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5 x 7'' Ivory Matt
$45

Acanthurus achilles

This is a species of surgeonfish that is named after Achilles, the Greek demigod of Homer’s Iliad.  Where Achilles had a weakness in his heel, the Achilles Tang, on the other hand, has a razor-sharp scalpel at the base of its tail.  The Hawaiian name for this fish is Paku’iku’i, refering to the method for catching the fish, which involves splashing or beating the water to scare the fish into nets.  Hawaiians used this fish for food and used its scalpel to make fishing lures.  The Achilles Tang measures up to 10 inches (25 cm) long and feeds on algae.  

Sunday, May 10, 2015

Moorish Idol

Moorish Idol
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
Matted in a 5 x 7'' Ivory Matt
$45

Zanclus cornutus

This fish is named after the Moors of Africa, who supposedly believed this fish to be a conveyor of happiness.  The Genus name for this fish, Zanclus, comes from the Greek word zanclon, which means “sickle,” and refers to the sickle-shaped dorsal fin.  The Hawaiian name for this fish is Kihikihi, meaning “curves”, “corners”, angular”, and “zigzag”, which all may refer to the color patterns on the fish.  The Moorish Idol measures up to nine inches (23 cm) and feeds on sponges.   


Saturday, May 9, 2015

Humuhumunukunukuāpuaʻa

Humuhumunukunukuāpuaʻa
Watercolor, Pen and Ink on Arches 140lb. Hot Press
 Matted in a 5 x 7'' Ivory Matt
$45

Rhinecanthus rectangulus

The Wedgetail Triggerfish, also commonly known by its Hawaiian name Humuhumunukunukuāpuaʻa, is the Hawaiian State fish.  Humuhumu is a term in the Hawaiian language that refers to all triggerfish and means “to stich pieces together,” and may refer to the geometric patterns found on the fish.  Nuku means “blunt,” and pua’a means “pig,” so, in other words, a Humuhumunukunukuāpuaʻa is a triggerfish with a blunt snout like a pig.  The Wedgetail Triggerfish measures up to 10 inches (25 cm) and feeds on bottom-dwelling reef invertebrates and algae.